Last Rites: The Best of What You Missed, Day One

I wrote a few words about Comet Control’s debut for Last Rites:

From the ashes of the late, lamented (by me, at least) Quest For Fire rise Comet Control. On their self-titled Tee Pee debut, this Toronto band takes the heavy, fuzzy, psychedelic garage rock they explored in QFF and both amplifies and hones that sound. Gone are the sometimes sloppy jammy bits, and Comet Control is all the better band for it. The songs are sharper and catchier, yet somehow heavier as well; the distortion comes in thick, reverberating walls that most often parallel the melodies like hedgerows on a road. This isn’t metal, nor is it stoner rock. It’s fuzz worship, and these folks are worthy prophets of what I hope will be a growing congregation.

Advertisements

Last Rites: Outré Monde – Krang vs. Krang

Craig and I return with an examination of Krangs that reside both north and south of the Canadian border:

Krang #1 is a Canadian four piece from Edmonton, Alberta, but alas, they are no more. I was saddened and angered to read that, with the April release of Winds of Change, they had decided to call it a day after five fruitful years. How could they do this to me? After all, I had only discovered them in 2013 and now they were gone. I know that’s a childish reaction, but sometimes when a band clicks with every part of your being you can’t understand that they have agency outside of your wants and desires. It’s when fandom gets scary. Let’s just say Krang and I are both lucky they’re far away and I can’t make their final show. No one wants to see an old man cry.

Last Rites: The Cutthroats 9 – Dissent

I wrote a review of the new record from The Cutthroats 9. Chris Spencer’s still got it.

The dis-ease keeps roiling. The first half of Dissent manages to repeatedly mulch your innards over and over. Familiarity is no defense; the feeling of having a rototiller in your liver for song after song returns with every spin. “Eraser” and “Hit The Ground” do an excellent job of making you nothing more than scrambled viscera, while “Dissension” teases you by taking out the tiller and putting everything back – if in the wrong order – and then kicking you repeatedly in the head.